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Paper Session
Nov 11, 2021 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM(America/Chicago)
20211111T1000 20211111T1050 America/Chicago Genre and Politics AMS 2021 ams@amsmusicology.org
Bach’s Chaconne as Initiation, or, Inner-European Musical Colonialism
Individual Paper 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM (America/Chicago) 2021/11/11 16:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 16:50:00 UTC

Among Joseph Joachim's students was the Italian Ettore Pinelli (1843-1915), an influential violin professor at the "Liceo Santa Cecilia", Rome, and founder and director of the "Società Orchestrale Romana." Pinelli remained an ardent supporter of Joachim, in effect dispersing, with Jessie Laussot and others, the German "classics" in Italy. The unpublished letters between Jessie Laussot Hillebrand, Ettore Pinelli, and Joachim (1864 - 1905), an especially rich and undiscussed trove, are kept at four archives in Hertogenbosch, Rome, Chicago, and Berlin. They reveal that Laussot, a well-connected English piano pedagogue and choir conductor who resided in Florence, systematically connected young Italian talents with well-known German pedagogues. She sent Pinelli to Joachim in 1864. Introducing young Italian musicians to "German" culture, as Laussot did with Pinelli and several pianists (Walter Bache, Giuseppe Buonamici, and Giovanni Sgambati), allowed them not only to acquire the skills and mindsets necessary to elevate "the state of Italian music," but also to foster appreciation for the Austro-German classics. As Pinelli informed Joachim in 1864, the state of Italian music at the time was "completely unsuitable to promote and develop a striving artist." Laussot chronicled the success of her protégés and corresponded with their teachers, as evident in unpublished letters from Joachim to Laussot, which point out Pinelli's progress.

Mirroring Joachim's conducting career in Hanover, which Pinelli witnessed during his studies, Pinelli conducted Haydn's _Creation_ in Rome in 1868 and gave the first Italian performance of Beethoven's 9th Symphony in 1879.

On the basis of Borchard (2005), Leistra-Jones (2016), Uhde (2018), and Eshbach (2021), this paper examines Joachim's function as _Vorbild_ for young non-German students, including his rituals of initiation. It investigates Joachim's key role in Pinelli's artistic life, revealing the latter's close adherence to the lessons learned from Joachim, particularly with regard to developing and elevating the state of classical music in Italy. By examining Pinelli's reports about his German cultural immersion, we can reconsider issues of German nationalism from an Italian perspective. The notion of an inner-European musical colonialism mirrors Joachim's own path of assimilation from under-developed Hungary to Mendelssohnian Leipzig. 

Presenters
MU
Michael Uhde
Musikhochschule Karlsruhe
KU
Katharina Uhde
Valparaiso University
The Peculiar Border Crossings of a Late Romantic Cantata
Individual Paper 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM (America/Chicago) 2021/11/11 16:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 16:50:00 UTC

Four performances of the cantata Im Buchenland (In Bukovina) by the composer Eusebius Mandyczewski (1857–1929) will be examined in this paper: the first is the premiere in 1889; the second and third are performances in the 1920s; and the fourth took place in 2018. The first and third performances were given in German; the second was in Romanian; and the fourth in German with a finale in Ukrainian. These four performances took place in three different countries, Austria-Hungary, Romania, and Ukraine; but they all happened in a single city, Czernowitz, at the same time the only place where the piece had been performed until 2018. Each performance zoomed in on the politics and predominant ideologies of its time, the late Habsburg Empire, interwar Greater Romania, and current Ukraine, respectively; after all, much is at stake when a musical piece is about a contested territory, Bukovina, which as a political entity had only come into existence in the late eighteenth century, was an entity for 160 years, and is today divided between two countries. The piece's original version bore traces of divergent views on Empire, internal colonization, and regional identification in the late Habsburg Era. The two performances in Greater Romania, in 1920 and 1927, betrayed tensions between a loyalty to the current and nostalgia for a past regime. And the 2018 performance in Ukraine highlighted the role of shifted borders and competing territorial claims, as well as regional identification and cosmopolitanism in our current age of reinvigorated nationalisms in a globalist context. The paper will demonstrate how this music was perceived to transcend boundaries, absorb diverse influences, and signify across linguistic divides, while it also served to promote national identification and to construct space and its borders.

Music as Political Manifesto: Elfrida Andrée’s Cantata for the Sixth Conference of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance (1911)
Individual Paper 10:00 AM - 10:50 AM (America/Chicago) 2021/11/11 16:00:00 UTC - 2021/11/11 16:50:00 UTC

The Sixth Conference of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance, hosted in Stockholm in 1911, welcomed delegates from 24 nations. Over one thousand additional guests purchased tickets to witness meetings and addresses by such eminent figures as the organization's founder Carrie Chapman Catt and Sweden's own Nobel Prize-winning author Selma Lagerlöf. The conference included contributions from male allies, and Hugo Alfvén composed a "Suffrage Song" for the opening ceremony. But the honor of composing and conducting the conference's musical highlight went to Sweden's preeminent female composer, Elfrida Andrée (1841-1929), a woman who, after campaigning to change Swedish laws forbidding women from becoming church organists, had become Europe's first female cathedral organist in 1867. Her 30-minute ­_Suffrage Cantata_ for women's voices and orchestra is a rare example of a large-scale political composition written and performed by women, and targeted to an audience of women.

Swedish-speaking scholars like Wikander (2006) and Peterson (2006) have related this conference to the era's philosophical discourses on women's rights in Sweden and abroad. Öhrstrom has identified some of the broad musical characteristics of Andrée's cantata while explaining its historical context (1999). Nevertheless, no scholarship has adequately demonstrated how the musical activities of the conference inflected its political message.

I analyze surviving manuscripts and primary sources such as conference reports to argue that Andrée's _Suffrage Cantata_, like many of the conference's speeches, functioned both as a call to action and as a statement of the distinct ideological priorities of its author. Its critique of the past oppression of Swedish women and evocation of pioneers like Fredrika Bremer (1801-65) illustrate a national struggle whose challenges resonated with an international audience. Andrée's compositions from as early as 1874 likewise associated women's civic engagement with Swedish nationalism. In addition to reinforcing the conference's emphasis on political rights for women, the _Suffrage Cantata_ strongly advocates for professional equality, one of Andrée's guiding principles. Analyzing the political implications of Andrée's _Suffrage Cantata_ not only improves our understanding of the roles music played in the women's suffrage movement, but also demonstrates how a composition may function as a political manifesto.

Presenters
JS
Jonathan Spatola-Knoll
St. Martin's University
St. Martin's University
Valparaiso University
Musikhochschule Karlsruhe
West Virginia University
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